University of New Haven – National Security Studies
Apr13

University of New Haven – National Security Studies

Major in truth, justice, and the American way! The University of New Haven offers National Security Studies through the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences. Be one of the good guys (white hat optional).

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The Deal With Majors
Apr02

The Deal With Majors

by Erin Westerman I thought I was all set. It was the beginning of the second semester of my freshman year in college and I had my classes all lined up.  But then I made a decision. I wanted to change majors from Marketing Communication to Hospitality Management.  So, even though it was a very inconvenient time, and it swamped me with work to catch up on because I joined the classes a week late, I loved it! Here are some tips if you’re thinking about changing your major, or declaring a major at all. Talk about it Discuss with your parents (or other trusted adults) what you would be good at, thecourses you liked in high school, and even what you know you definitely don’t want to do. (Believe it or not, they will probably have some helpful advice!) If you have a lot of options floating around in your head, don’t be afraid to talk to your advisor, thedean of a specific major, or students who are currently studying in the field you may be interested in. Think about the long term I know, this can be terrifying. However, I think some of the best advice is to think about the careers you are interested in that correlate to your field of study. A lot of people work towards a degree without giving much thought to what they will do with it afterwards. Find out what types of jobs are out there to see what would best suit you. Dip your toes in I have so many interests that narrowing them down to one thing I want to focus on is nearly impossible. But, if you think you may be interested in something, give it a try. Like sociology? Take an introductory class and try it out. Chances are, it satisfies a core requirement. If you find out that it’s something you are interested in or you switch majors and have a ton of credits in one subject, make it a minor like I am doing with Communications. Do internships!!!! I cannot stress this enough! Part of the reason I chose Endicott was because of the internship program. Students have a four-week internship in January during both freshman and sophomore years, then a full semester internship senior year. I had already been leaning toward changing my major when I started my month working 9-5 in a public relations department. Getting out there and getting that real world experience helped to reaffirm that notion that this was not right for me, and I didn’t have to wait until after graduation to find that out. It’s okay to be...

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Most Unusual College Courses of 2010
Dec08

Most Unusual College Courses of 2010

When touring a college campus, it's impossible to imagine the number and scope of classes the school may offer. Course topics may range from the basic freshman English to something far more exotic. In the post below, guest blogger Jayson Jones offers his list of the most unusual courses of 2010.  A guest post by Jayson Jones: For most, the college years entail years of prerequisite (AKA boring) classes that require lots of studying and effort to pass with high marks. There are, however, some exceptions to the norm. Even some of the top academic institutions are beginning to offer unique (and even downright strange) courses to help students learn in a more creative and interesting way that they can relate to. Evidently, even colleges are striving to keep up with popular culture. We've searched high and low to find the most unusual college courses in the United States. Here's what we discovered. Tree Climbing: Cornell University offers a tree climbing course in lieu of playing sports. That's right; students can learn how to climb in the canopy of a tree then move from tree to tree in the air. This unusual class satisfies a physical education credit.  Dogs and How We Know Them: This course seems like a given for all those dog-lovers out there. Offered at Harvard University, the class examines the history of dogs and how their domestication and breeding has been conceptualized. It examines the social behavior and symbolism of the role of dogs in the lives of human beings. The Joy of Garbage: This one definitely sounds like a made-up course, but Santa Clara University offers a science course that examines decomposition and sustainability through the study of actual garbage (including nuclear waste). Students visit local landfills and sanitation plants on field trips. Maple Syrup Making: Alfred University has a course in maple syrup making where students learn how syrup is made, then taste and make their own. Yum! The Science of Harry Potter: Frostburg State University offers a course in which students learn about physics by studying the Harry Potter series, and whether the phenomena in the books could be plausible given genetic engineering, antigravity, etc. The Science of Superheroes: Using a familiar context of superheroes (Spider-Man, Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, etc.), UC Irvine professors teach students about the physics of flying and fluid dynamics. Pro Wrestling: This class won't actually teach you to wrestle like a pro, but it will review the cultural history of wrestling and how the depiction of American masculinity has been represented through time. The class is offered at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of the Comparative...

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