CORT Helps with College Students’ Furniture while Parents Relax
Aug17

CORT Helps with College Students’ Furniture while Parents Relax

Got the college move-in blues? Stressed? Need help with college students’ furniture? Maybe renting furniture is the option for you.

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College Dorm Move-in Just Got Easier with DormCo
Jul07

College Dorm Move-in Just Got Easier with DormCo

Smart College Visit partners with DormCo to help you find exactly what you need for your college dorm move-in. Check out our list of college dorm must-haves!

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College Roommate Check-up Time
Sep09

College Roommate Check-up Time

Living with a college roommate is a huge adjustment — for BOTH roommates. If you’ve been rooming together just long enough to discover what really irritates you about the other, these tips are for you!

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Choosing A Dorm – What to Look For
Feb05

Choosing A Dorm – What to Look For

Once you’ve made the decision to live on campus, you still have to decide on a dorm. Even though the dorms are all on the same college campus, it’s possible they can be very different from each other.

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Living On Campus: Who cleans the bathroom?
Feb21

Living On Campus: Who cleans the bathroom?

As you get ready to visit a college campus for the first (or fifth) time, one of the most important things you can check out while you are there is on-campus housing. If you (or your student) hadn’t planned on living on campus the first year, there are a few things you should know. And,  if you were planning on making use of on-campus housing, there are some great questions to ask – they may not be what you’re thinking. So why live On? Students who live on campus their first year at college tend to do better academically than those students who live off-campus. At our institution, students who live on campus typically average a half-point higher GPA over the course of their first year at the university than those who live off campus.  Our on-campus students are also more likely to return to college the next year. The main reason for this is more than likely the proximity of their housing to campus – when you live close to all that’s going on, it’s easier for you to get involved. It’s also easier to get to class when you oversleep! These are the two most important reasons we encourage students to live on-campus their first year, though there are several others: making friends, getting connected to campus, academic support and resources close to home, and staff to support your transition from high school to college being just a few of these. Once you make the decision to live on campus, there are a few questions that you’ll have about what that looks like at your institution of choice, but I encourage you to also consider a few of the following questions when you visit with staff at that campus. What percentage of your first-year class lives on campus? In other words, who are you or your student going to be living with? Do you have dedicated facilities for first-year students? For upper class students? How do you encourage and support students who live on campus academically? What resources do you provide in your halls to promote academics? How do you help students engage in campus life? Engagement in campus activities and events is a huge indicator of whether students will stay in college, so it’s important that your residence life program support this. How do you assign roommates and why? Many schools allow students to select their own roommates. Others use roommate matching services to do assignments. Still others do assignment based on academic programs or year in school. And some do a combination of some or all of these. The first year at college is an important...

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When Your Child Turns 18 and Goes to College: What Parents Need to Know
Oct25

When Your Child Turns 18 and Goes to College: What Parents Need to Know

Things to know when your child goes to college For some parents, it seems all that all they did was blink and their babies morphed overnight into young adults. In reality, the parents probably spent years preparing for that moment when their offspring would step through that opening that slams the door shut on childhood and swings open the door to adulthood. When your child goes to college, some important things change. So, what happens now that your baby is 18, a legal adult, and headed to college?  For starters, parents (and their student) need to talk about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The first exposure to FERPA will likely come during the college admissions application process. Students will be presented with a FERPA statement when applying to, or accepting an offer of admission from, any school that receives federal funding from the U.S. Department of Education — which they will be required to sign. Signing the FERPA statement is an acknowledgement by the student that he/she understands his/her right to review their academic record, control disclosure (grant who has permission to review the record), and request changes if an error is detected. According to Eric Stoller, Student Affairs and Technology blogger for Inside Higher Ed, FERPA can be the basis for some amazing conversations between students and their parents. “The biggest thing about FERPA is that most schools have clearly defined policies that are available for parents/families. The education about FERPA starts during the Admissions process and really takes hold during Orientation. Most people are okay with FERPA once they realize that it was designed to protect a student’s privacy.” Getting the bill vs. footing the tuition bill Another change that takes place when your child goes to college: once your child accepts an offer of admission, communication from the school with the parents pretty much disappears — if it has not already done so. Your child will receive the tuition bill and any information related to financial aid and/or scholarships. Many schools have moved to online payment of tuition and fees. Regardless of who is actually paying for college, it’s the student who gets the bill online, not the parent. Students who, as high schoolers, rarely checked their email now must do so in order to keep up with deadlines and notifications related to entering college. Stoller points out that some schools have systems in place that help parents out when it comes to keeping abreast of information available only online. “There have actually been some developments on the part of student online services providers to create access points for parents/families to be able to...

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