Smart See, Smart Do: Concord University Homecoming, Football, and Campus Visits
Sep16

Smart See, Smart Do: Concord University Homecoming, Football, and Campus Visits

— Catch the heart of Concord University by visiting during #Homecoming Week. See whether a small, community-focused campus would be a good fit for you.

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Where’d They Go to School?™ – Stars of GLEE

July 9, 2010 Way before they sang and danced through the halls of William McKinley High School, a lot of GLEE cast members did what you’re doing now — looked for a college. Below, see who studied where. Matthew Morrison (Will Schuester) New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts Jayma Mays (Emma Pillsbury) Radford University Jane Lynch (Sue Sylvester) Illinois State University and Cornell University Jessalyn Gilsig (Terri Schuester) McGill University and Harvard University’s American Repertory Theatre Jenna Ushkowitz (Tina Cohen-Chang) Marymount Manhattan College Mark Salling (Noah Puck Puckerman) Los Angeles Music Academy Josh Sussman (Jacob Ben Israel) New York Conservatory for Dramatic Arts Iqbal Theba (Principal Figgins) University of Oklahoma Patrick Gallagher (Coach Tanakain) National Theatre School of Canada {Lea Michele (Rachel Berry) was accepted at NYU’s Tisch School but chose to continue her stage career.} *** Kathie Dickenson is an award-winning higher-education writer and editor and a regular contributor to SmartCollegeVisit. “Where’d They Go to School™ is a series appearing on...

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Smart See, Smart Do: University of New Haven
Jun08

Smart See, Smart Do: University of New Haven

Planning to visit University of New Haven? Be sure to check out Travel Tips to help you plan your college visit.

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Smart See, Smart Do™: Indiana University Bloomington
Jun01

Smart See, Smart Do™: Indiana University Bloomington

A Beloved Campus Presence: Herman B Wells Sculpture Whether he was greeting a child or meeting with dignitaries from around the world, IU Bloomington’s late president Herman B Wells exuded a warmth that made him beloved by students, faculty, and the Bloomington community. Today a life-size bronze likeness of Wells by sculptor Tuck Langland sits in the center of campus where thousands of students walk each day. Placed on a park bench, the sculpture depicts Wells with his favorite hat, his tie loosened, and his hand extended – palm down, as was his habit of greeting. When you visit IU, you’ll see the sculpture in the historic Old Crescent section of campus, among some of the “oldest and most beautiful buildings on campus,” says IU alumna and communications staff member Jocelyn Bowie. She says the sculpture is “near some of the woods that Dr. Wells insisted were part of the beauty of the campus … and facing Bloomington’s downtown, because Dr. Wells also was famous for integrating IU into the larger community.” Wells the man served as president of the university from 1938 until 1962 and as chancellor from 1962 until 2000. In shaping IU into what it is today, he championed research, the arts, international programs, and academic freedom. According to Bowie, he also “never forgot to congratulate faculty members and students on their accomplishments,” and his handwritten notes are cherished by all who received them. As president, he personally signed every student’s diploma. At Christmas time, he dressed as Santa and roamed the campus ringing bells and passing out treats, even when he was in a wheelchair. Bowie notes that “he lived until the age of 97 and until his death he attended events all over campus. Especially important to the community, he attended every funeral and memorial service for the faculty and staff who preceded him in death.” Wells died in 2000, a few months before the Langland sculpture was dedicated. To schedule a visit to IU Bloomington, click here  or call (812) 855-0661. The IU admissions office advises: “It’s best if you can give us two weeks’ notice so we can tailor your visit to your interests. If you plan to visit in less than two weeks, schedule your visit by phone rather than online.” Indiana University Visitor Information Center530 East Kirkwood Avenue, Suite 104Bloomington, IN 47408www.iub.edu To learn more, click about Herman B Wells Click to search for a nearby hotel. Planning to visit IU Bloomington? Be sure to check out Travel Tips to help you plan your college visit. You may also download or print our free smart college visit evaluation form to help...

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Honors Programs: Get an Ivy-League Education at a Public School
Jan20

Honors Programs: Get an Ivy-League Education at a Public School

Christina McIntyre, associate director of University Honors at Virginia Tech and founder of BecomeAlum, says being in one of the honors programs can include opportunities that are outside the norm for individual students. She says it’s a way to get “an ivy-league education at a public university.” Because honors programs vary widely in structure and mission, McIntyre recommends scheduling face-to-face meetings with honors program staff when you visit schools: “An actual visit can reveal how people involved in the honors program interact with students as individuals.” Preparing for the Visit: What Should I Ask? As you research honors programs via web page or brochure, consider the primary questions below; then form follow-up questions to ask in person: Primary Question #1 What is the focus of the honors experience? Is it strictly a matter of taking harder/more in-depth courses to achieve an honors diploma, or is there more? Example Follow-up Questions Are there opportunities/requirements for independent research, creative projects, collaborative projects, community projects, presentations, travel? Is there a series of required courses, or can I shape my own program? For example, can I take a regular course and work with the professor to make it an honors course for me? Primary Question #2 How would the honors program connect with my major? Example Follow-up Questions How have past students in my major completed the honors diploma? Would my honors courses count toward my major or general education requirements? Would I have an honors adviser and a major adviser? If I enter school as an undeclared major, would I still be able to make progress toward an honors diploma? Primary Question #3 Is there a residential component to the honors program (a “living/learning community” in which honors students live in the same residence hall)? Example Follow-up Questions If there is not a residential component: Are there other opportunities for interaction among honors students? If there is a residential component: Is the purpose mainly to give honors students a quiet place to live, or are opportunities built in for academic and social interaction? Are honors program staff part of the community? Would I have a student mentor? Tell me more. (McIntyre notes: “National research has shown that students who are part of living/learning communities perform better academically and are more engaged in the university.”) Primary Question #4 What benefits does the honors program offer that I might not have thought about? Example Follow-up Question I noticed on your web page that honors students get priority registration. What does this mean? Why do honors students get priority registration? (McIntyre notes: “Comparing the way a variety of schools answer questions like this one can...

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Visit Advice from St. Catherine University
Jan18

Visit Advice from St. Catherine University

Senior Admission Counselor Mary Sue Miheve of St. Catherine University encourages students to visit schools in which they may be interested: “Not only does it give you an idea of the actual facilities and lay-out of the college campus, it can also give you an idea of the community and culture. Are students in the quad eating lunch, chatting between classes or throwing a frisbee, or is everyone wearing headphones and walking to classes in silence? A campus tour can also give you time to chat with a current student about her experience and truly allow you to gauge the personality of the campus and the make-up of the student body.” Some tips from St. Kate’s Mary Sue Miheve: Start visiting in your sophomore or junior year of high school. These first visits can help you begin to understand exactly what would be the best fit for you. Do you like the feel of a large state university or a small private campus? Do you want to stay close to home or be farther away? Do you want to be in an urban environment or a more rural setting? Visiting a variety of campuses will help you answer these questions. Take some time to think about your campus visit ahead of time. Sit down with your family and think of questions you would like to ask and topics you would like to discuss with both an admission representative and current students. When setting up your campus visit be specific as to what you would like to hear and see. For example, if you are interested in Art be sure to ask if the Art studio is part of the tour. If it is not, ask if someone can show you the facilities separately. This will allow the admission office to understand your needs and give you clear expectations about your visit. “At St. Kate's,” says Miheve, “our tour allows students to choose 2-3 unique sites (for example, the Art Gallery, Nutrition/Fashion Labs, Nursing Labs, or specific offices) to see during their tour time in addition to the standard tour route. These are places that may not be of interest to every student but that can meet individual students’ interests. As a small campus we feel it is important to give each student a sense of the individual attention they will receive while attending school here starting right from their first campus tour. Most tours are one-on-one, meaning one tour guide per family.” St. Catherine University sits on 110 wooded acres in the Highland Village neighborhood of St. Paul, Minnesota — less than a mile from the Mississippi River and...

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