Where’d They Go To School: Late Night Comedians
Feb06

Where’d They Go To School: Late Night Comedians

Where did the top late night comedians go to college? They’re smart. They’re funny. They are the top late night comedians and they went to college.   Stephen Colbert Hampden-Sydney College ; transferred to Northwestern University, B.A. Theatre Arts @HSC1776 | @NorthwesternU Jimmy Fallon College of Saint Rose, B.A. Communications; Doctorate of Humane Letters @CollegeofStRos Arsenio Hall Attended Ohio University; Kent State University, B.A. Speech/Film & Television @ohiou | @ksunews Jay Leno Attended Emerson College, B.A. Speech Therapy @EmersonCollege David Letterman Attended Ball State University, B.A. Radio and Television @bsudailynews Jimmy Kimmel Attended University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Arizona State University @UNLVNews | @ASU Conan O’Brien Harvard University, B.A. History and Literature @Harvard Jon Stewart College of William and Mary, B.A. Psychology @WMNews Who’s your favorite?   Sources for this post include Wikipedia.com and Biography.com. Illustration by Steven White, a.k.a. “Sketchy Steven” Like this post? Check out our entire series: Where’d They Go To...

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Should I Play Sports in College?
Jun12

Should I Play Sports in College?

— Are you a star athlete in high school? Thinking about playing your sport in college? Choosing whether or not to play a sport in college can be a difficult decision and plays a big role in where you decide to attend.

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What to put in your 500 Word College Application Essay
Sep05

What to put in your 500 Word College Application Essay

A guest post by Ed Weathers Your 500 Word College Application Essay should be about the real YOU. These days, most colleges require that your application essay be no more than 500 words. In that essay, colleges expect you to reveal your writing ability and, just as important, the real You, with a capital Y. Who are You? What makes You tick? What are Your hopes, expectations, fears, joys, tastes, desires, foibles, sins, and virtues? That’s a lot to expect of a 500 word college application essay. Of course, you can’t say everything about yourself in 500 words. Forget that list two sentences ago; you can’t fit all that in 500 words. You must narrow the focus of your essay. So what do you write? Some experts suggest that you start your 500 word college application essay with a brief personal story and then draw a “moral” from it that expresses your values. There’s nothing wrong with that advice, but if I were a college admissions officer, I’d be sick by now of essays that begin with a touching little tale about a wise grandfather, a handicapped sibling, or a South American orphan the applicant met on a summer good-works trip. I’d prefer hearing about why you still drink only chocolate milk at the age of 17, or how Bonnie Sue McKay broke your heart at the age of twelve (and how you got over it by learning to quilt), or why table tennis is your favorite sport, or how you, with your tin ear, wept the first time you heard Schumann’s Piano Concerto. If I’m your college admissions officer, forget “touching.” Give me honest and accurate, instead. Give me “tough” before “touching.” Give me clear observations — in your own words, please, not stock phrases. Give me concrete images: a chocolate milk stain on a white hospital gown, a quilting needle stuck in your index finger, a cracked ping-pong ball behind the basement furnace, a scratchy old recording coming out of a friend’s iPod. Give me wit, if you’ve got it, but don’t strain for something that doesn’t come naturally. Give me honest feeling, not prepackaged, Hallmark-card, tell-’em-what-they-want-to hear mush. If you now hate quilting and prefer rugby to table tennis, fine, write that. If I’m your college admissions officer, think hard about chocolate milk or Bonnie Sue or table tennis or Schumann, and answer me this question, as accurately and honestly as you can: Why is this important to you? If you think you know the answer to that question before you start writing, then you don’t know what writing is. Writing — through thinking and brainstorming and free-writing and revising and revising—is a way of searching for the answers to such a question and then writing down those answers as accurately as you can....

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Questions to ask on the Admitted Student Campus Visit
Mar27

Questions to ask on the Admitted Student Campus Visit

– The admitted student visit is an important part of the college decision process. You’ve applied, been offered admission, now it’s your turn to make a decision about which college to choose.

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Freshmen: Should I Bring My Car to Campus?
Jul09

Freshmen: Should I Bring My Car to Campus?

A question frequently asked during a college visit information session is “Can I bring my car to campus?” The answer to this is either going to be “Yes” or “No” depending on the school’s policy. “Should I?” is the question prospective students usually fail to ask. Below, Megan Wilson, Assistant Director of Admission at Western Carolina University addresses this topic as part of our heading to college series. The question of the ages: Should I bring my car to college when I move to campus? Students, when deciding whether or not to pack your wheels along with your bedding and clothing, there are a few things to consider. First, does your intended college allow freshmen to bring their cars? This may clear up the “to bring or not to bring” question right off the bat. Secondly, look at where your college is located. Is there an on-campus transportation system? A public transportation system that has a stop on campus? If you’re attending a college in a large city, these options should be available. If you are attending a more rural institution, a local public transportation system may be less established or might have shorter operating hours. Ask yourself why you want to bring your car to campus. Do you really need a car or is it a convenience or comfort issue? Can you carpool with people also attending your university? (If yes, then having a car is a convenience.) Do you plan on going home every weekend or once a month? (If yes, then having a car is a comfort.) Do you have a job back home that requires regular trips back? (If yes, then having a car is a necessity.) Are you planning on working off-campus while attending college? (If yes, then having a car is a necessity.) Having a car on campus is not a decision to take lightly. Are you prepared for or can you afford the day-to-day maintenance of owning a personal vehicle? Sit down with your parents. Discuss the pros and cons of bringing your car to campus. I didn’t bring a car to college as a freshman and I survived. I walked. Caught rides with friends. Worked on campus. I learned my way around my university and made friends. I built a relationship with my roommate, my suitemates and my university, and it made my college experience exciting. It made it…more. Bottom line, there is no right or wrong answer. Whether you bring your car or leave it at home, the decision is ultimately up to you.  You can always do it on a trial basis and see how it goes. *** Megan...

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The Top 10 Questions to ask about Study Abroad Programs
Mar03

The Top 10 Questions to ask about Study Abroad Programs

“Do you have study abroad programs?” is only the first question you should ask. Here are 10 questions to ask about study abroad during your college visit.

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