St. Lawrence University – 1st Year Experience
Mar28

St. Lawrence University – 1st Year Experience

If you’re wondering what your 1st year experience will be like once you get into college, you’re not alone. Taking that big, next step is exciting for some and terrifying for others. Colleges know this and can help.

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SCV 5 Minute Guide to Study Abroad
Apr15

SCV 5 Minute Guide to Study Abroad

Did you know there’s more than one way to study abroad? Check out our new 5-Minute Guide to Study Abroad and get started planning your college journey abroad.

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5 Survival Tips for Taking Online College Courses
Mar04

5 Survival Tips for Taking Online College Courses

All college students should expect at least one all-online class as part of any degree program. These five tips will help you stay on track even without the personal interaction of a traditional classroom.

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The Dos and Don’ts of Being Deferred
Feb15

The Dos and Don’ts of Being Deferred

While being deferred from your first-choice early action or early decision application can be upsetting, take heart. These do’s and don’ts will help the deferred student.

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No Day but Today: Get Involved in Extracurricular Activities
Jan24

No Day but Today: Get Involved in Extracurricular Activities

“What else is there to do here?” This is often a question on the minds of college-bound students when they visit a college campus. Our advice — Don’t hesitate to ask about extracurricular activities. Ask questions during the information session and also ask the students you meet on campus if they’re involved in any student clubs or organizations. For Adam Britten, a senior at Syracuse University, and recent co-host of SmartCollegeVisit’s CampusChat, being involved in extracurricular activities has been an asset to his college career in more ways than one. He shares his advice on getting involved in the guest post below. No Day but Today… Adam Britten With so many opportunities for involvement, many college students have no clue where to start.  The benefits of extracurricular activities are very apparent: you can make lots of new friends, expand your learning outside of the classroom and advance your career potential and hirability.  (Well, Ultimate Frisbee might not get you a job…but you never know!)  The most important thing to know is that you should be getting involved with SOMETHING while you are in college. The best time to get involved is at the beginning of each semester. Very freqeuntly, schools will have “student involvement fairs” where you can get information about different clubs. Even if there isn’t an official event, most clubs actively look for new members and hold interest meetings at the beginning of the year or semester. As for myself, I got involved from day one of college. It wasn’t a stretch for me, as I was involved in a few activities in high school.  The first clubs I joined paralleled my high school clubs. I joined student government and I signed my name up on a list of people interested in student theatre. (Even if you are remotely intersted in an activity, sign up for their emails – you’ll get all the information you need and be able to ask any qusetions you have.) Start Early I am so thankful that I started my involvement early. Throughout school, I have grown very close to some people that I met within the first few months of school while I was participating in these activities.  As the years went on, I joined a few new clubs (and realized that some of the ones I joined weren’t my style.)  I’m still involved in that same theatre group, and all because I gave them my email address. I couldn’t imagine being at school without the friends I have made in First Year Players. This goes along with the saying “birds of a feather flock together.” If you join a club that...

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Have Questions on Your College Tour ? Ask the Natives
Sep09

Have Questions on Your College Tour ? Ask the Natives

We asked Chelsea Merget, our public relations intern from Boston University, if students or parents touring campus ever stop and ask her questions. They do and below is Chelsea's take on her role as a BU native.  I have been approached by several students visiting the campus. I also work in an area on campus that handles a lot of visiting traffic so I have had rather lengthy conversations with parents and students about BU.   One of my favorite questions a student asked was, "What did I like least about BU?" Even though it was kind of difficult for me to answer, I really appreciated her train of thought–what complaints do these students really have about their school? Instead of answering where the best place to live is or my favorite place to hang out like I have a hundred times, I actually had to think about a negative knowing it could make or break a college decision. I was honest about the cost of tuition being a challenge and that sometimes we wonder where our undergrad fee goes. There was no positive way to answer this question except to be completely honest.  Another factor that really makes a difference when answering questions is having the student, not the parent, do the asking. It is the student, after all, who will be attending the college, so they should ask questions that they want answered.   Even with the parent present, there is a difference in how I answer questions compared to when I am directly addressing a student.  My answers are more informal, more approachable, and possibly more honest and frank with a student.  When parents ask questions, a lot of times students feel the need to impress them with statistics, facts, and the typical answers. I always feel more comfortable giving my honest opinion to a student directly, especially if the student is alone. In addition, I think the student feels a more personal connection with the school if they have a real, human interaction with another student.   *** Asking a student on campus what they like least is a great question! Here are 15 other questions to consider asking when on your college tour: Student-to-Student: Questions to ask on a College...

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