Should I Play Sports in College?
Jun12

Should I Play Sports in College?

— Are you a star athlete in high school? Thinking about playing your sport in college? Choosing whether or not to play a sport in college can be a difficult decision and plays a big role in where you decide to attend.

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CampusChat: Six Best College Tips from Expert Guests

#CampusChat is an online chat that takes place on Wednesday evenings from 9-10 pm, Eastern. With six weeks of chats now under our belt, there has been a steady stream of tips and advice flowing from the fingertips of our expert guests. Here are some of the best tips and how they apply to college admissions and academic success. Best tip for to manage the influx of e-mailed information from colleges and universities: Set up an individual email account for all college correspondence and make it professional. Avoid cutesy names such as "hotstuff@gmail.com." Parents and Teens: share the password to the account. It can be very helpful to have more than one set of eyes reviewing the information sent by colleges. (Suzanne Shaffer, Parents Countdown to College Coach) Best college visit tip: "Do not visit your first college choice first." (From Eric Yaverbaum, author of Life's Little College Admissions Insights: Top Tips from the Country's Most Acclaimed Guidance Counselors*) Best SAT test prep tip: Read every day. The worst thing you can is not read everyday. (Jenn Cohen, founder Word-Nerd, SAT vocab prep program) Also, check out the College Board's recommended reading list for excellent choices in summer (anytime) reading material:  http://bit.ly/dpy3pk. Best tip for the role academic planning plays during college search: Look up grad rates on collegeresults.org then, ask schools how they are trying to improve. Four-year graduation rate is 38%;  six-year rate equals roughly 60% at US college and universities. (Christina McIntyre, founder BecomeAlum) Best tip for students enrolled in college (and for those enrolling soon): Definition of a "koofer" – an old test or study guide (Koofers were once stored in coffers). A koofer makes a terrific study guide. (Michael Rihani, co-founder, Koofers, a resource for academic support, providing materials and planning resources to college students) And, the best tip for parents, teens, and college admissions offices: Second to the college visit, peer influence plays the greatest role in deciding where to go to school. (According to parents of newly accepted teens and first participants in #CampusChat: Eileen Paulin and Tom Field) Next #CampusChat: Wednesday, 9 PM ET with guest @WilliamPaid. The topic will be living on a college student's budget – managing rent and building...

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Don’t Pick a College Sight Unseen
Feb23

Don’t Pick a College Sight Unseen

As a parent of two kids who attended college, I learned a very valuable lesson: never pick a college sight unseen. The rules that apply to any major purchase are even more important when making the decision to invest thousands of dollars on a college education. You would never buy a car without test-driving it, or move into a home without taking a walk through and getting a home inspection. Based on my experience with both my kids, I can tell you that your teen should never accept admission to a college without getting a feel for the campus and campus life. My daughter had her heart set on attending a university in Boston. It was inexplicable to her father and me because she had never visited the city. But from the time she was a child she dreamed of going to college there. She worked hard in school and had the grades and the high school resume to assure her acceptance to just about any top-tiered college. She was indeed accepted to several colleges in the Boston area, receiving a full-ride scholarship to one of them. But, before signing on the dotted line, I suggested we plan a trip to all the schools, just to be sure she was happy with the college that offered her a 4-year scholarship. Needless to say, it’s a good thing we did. The minute we set foot on the campus she knew it was not for her. It was too small, there was no Greek life, and she did not seem to fit in with the student population. On the other hand, there was another college that had offered her a nice financial aid package and when she met with admissions, financial aid, and some students, felt completely at home. If she had opted to attend the university that gave her a full scholarship, she would have been home in a semester—there is no doubt in my mind. It was the college visit that sealed the deal and she spent four fabulous years in Boston, and two more as a graduate student. My son attended college after a four-year tour of duty in the Marine Corps. He chose a university based on the recommendations of his fellow marines. He never set foot on the campus or took the time to speak with any of the students or faculty before showing up for his first day of class. He found out that the college that he thought would be “social” on the weekends was a graveyard. Most of the students were local and went home to their families. Most of the freshman class...

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