Smart Q & A: How Do I Get My App Fee Waived?
Dec30

Smart Q & A: How Do I Get My App Fee Waived?

QUESTION: How do I get my app fee waived?  ANSWER: Ask! Colleges typically have a fee-waiver policy. Search the college’s web site or contact the admissions office for details regarding qualification.  Since application fees range from $25-$75 per school, the cost to apply can add up especially if you’re applying to more than one college. It does not hurt to ask about a fee-waiver and having the application fee waived will not impact review of your application. The National Association for College Admission Counseling provides a form students who meet the criteria can use to apply to any college. The criteria and form can be found here: NACAC Request for Admission Applicaiton Fee Waiver. Application fees can be waived for many reasons and policies will vary from school to school.  Here are a some examples: Need-based/you have limited financial resources, are applying for financial aid, or the cost of the application fee presents a hardship for your family First-Gen/you are the first in your family to apply to college Child of an alum (also known as a legacy applicant)/your parents graduated from the college to which you are applying Special offer/the college may run a fee-waiver promotion for a limited time In-State or Out-of-State applicant/some colleges waive fees depending on where you live Military/you’re applying for ROTC or Corps of Cadets Note there may be additional forms or deadlines related to applying for a fee-waiver, so be sure to contact the admissions office, seek help from your guidance counselor and search online for information for each college that interests you. If you’re just getting started with the college admissions process, don’t hesitate to ask about fee-waivers when you visit college or when the college rep visits your high school....

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Tonight on CampusChat: First Generation College Students Challenges & Myths
Mar21

Tonight on CampusChat: First Generation College Students Challenges & Myths

Colleges and universities throughout the country have innovative programs and mentoring to assist and support first generation students, as well as low income students.  And while these two groups often overlap, their needs and challenges are often different.  Shonda Goward from George Washington University invites guidance counselors and college admissions personnel to discuss the different ways campuses are addressing these important audiences during #CampusChat at 9pm EST on March 21.  In addition to her work as an academic advisor at George Washington University, Shonda is founder of First Generation University, where she blogs with advice and resources to help first-gen students and their families understand and adapt to college life.  CampusChat is open to the public for participation. Anyone with a Twitter id can join the conversation by adding “#campuschat” to their Twitter message. Follow Smart College Visit @collegevisit for announcements about the chat. You're also invited to follow Shonda at @FirstGenU.  Go to: What is #CampusChat? for the Smart College Visit Twitter chat tutorial. Related info and school mentions: Top 3 Choices I Would Make If I Were a College Student Today Smart College Visit Profile: George Washington University  High School Spring Break Campus Visit Planner Press Release: #CampusChat Discusses First Gen & Low Income Students This...

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Takeaway Tweets & Transcript from #CampusChat: Changing Higher Ed
Mar16

Takeaway Tweets & Transcript from #CampusChat: Changing Higher Ed

We tossed out the question: "How would you change higher ed" as the open mic topic for #CampusChat on Wednesday, March 14, 2012, and were blown away by the fervor and ideas participants shared.  Below are just a few of the Takeaway Tweets. Keep the conversation going — read the complete #CampusChat transcript and follow and follow up with the participants.  Next week, join us at 9PM ET on #CampusChat when our guest will be Shonda Goward, founder of First Generation University. Follow her on Twitter  @FirstGenU. And, by the way, how would you change higher...

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