SmartCollegeVisit October 2010 Digest
Oct31

SmartCollegeVisit October 2010 Digest

Each month, an amazing group of students, parents, writers, educators, and consultants appear on SmartCollegeVisit. Though this web site is centered around our passion for helping people get the most from their college visits, we also explore topics that may be of interest to parents (and students) once their teens are enrolled in college.  Today, I want to thank everyone who contributed to our posts during the month of October. Though October may be the 10th month of the year, it's the 12th month we've been publishing articles for college-bound teens and their families! So, a big thank you goes to the following folks who contributed to SmartCollegeVisit's 12th month: GUEST WRITERS/CONTRIBUTORS Eric Stoller, for answering my questions and sharing insights about how colleges are there for the parents, too. —  When Your Child Turns 18 and Goes to College: What Parents Need to Know Duong Sheahan and the ChicagoMoms for permission to repost Duong's story of her journey as a parent of a college-bound teen.  Janson Woodlee, co-founder of IvyEyesEditing for his guest post: The 5 Biggest Mistakes in College Admissions Essays and Anne Giles Clelland for the College Admission Application Checklist. college students: David Replogle, Corey Bobco, Lauren Joffe for their posts from The Real College Guide. Nancy Berk, for sharing the news with me about her high school senior, Hunter Berk, and his effort to help everyone gain access to college prep materials.  CAMPUSCHAT GUESTS Chad Ratliff, whose chat on the topic The Knowledge Workforce ended early due to technical difficulties with Twitter. We will revisit that topic with Chad again.  Sharon Mostyn, who asked great questions about what parents need to know when beginning the college admissions process with their teens.  College students, Kelly Rivard and Chelsea Merget, for leading the discussion on student jobs by talking about the number of jobs they are juggling while in college and how they try to keep up with a school/social/work life balance.  Jennifer Forde, customer service representative for Fleet Aviation who provided information about the value and affordability of charter flights to visit campuses on the east coast.  The entire group of regulars to #CampusChat and all of those who are discovering the chat and joining in on our discussions to help teens, parents, admissions reps and counselors. It's an inspiring group of people to meet with each week.  OUR WRITERS THIS MONTH AND THE SCHOOLS  Writers: Val McGinnis and Lisa Campbell Warren  Schools:  Columbia University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, University of Virginia (College Tour Halloween Haunts) Liberty University (Snowflex) Syracuse University (Whitman School of Management) Virginia Tech (One student's story) Stay tuned — subscribe to SmartCollegeVisit — we're covering more schools,...

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Smart Learning at the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University

A business school after Aristotle’s heart “What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing,” said Aristotle (384-322 BC). If the Greek philosopher chose to study business today, he’d feel right at home as an undergraduate at Syracuse University’s Whitman School of Management.  Experiential learning, aka “learning by doing,” is at the core of  Whitman’s bachelor of science programs in accounting, entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises, finance, marketing, management, real estate, retail management, and supply chain management. It’s not surprising, then, that internships, community service, and international experience related to the student’s program of study all are required (and not just options) for all undergraduates and are actively facilitated by faculty and staff.  In the classroom, experiences that at many business schools usually would be reserved for MBA students are the norm (think: real-life case studies, simulations, hands-on research and development projects, team efforts, competitions for seed-money prizes, and more).   The Most Unique Thing “The most unique thing about Whitman is its EEE457* class, in which students come up with an innovative product or service, write a business plan on it, and then present it to a panel of judges. "Tons of work," one graduate of the school’s top-ranked entrepreneurship program, reported on BusinessWeek.com. “However, it was a great experience that enabled us to apply everything we learned in all of our other Whitman classes, as well as learn much more.” Ask a finance major about the most unique thing and you’re sure to hear about the Orange Value Fund**, a $1.1 million student-managed fund created with the objective of training Whitman students to become money managers. Through participation, students gain meaningful firsthand experience and a deep understanding of value investing. The program is housed in Whitman’s Ballentine Investment Institute, which was founded by alumnus Steven Ballentine (’83), to “bring the markets alive to the students.”  For a close-up look at these and other unique learning opportunities, check out online video presentations by and interviews with Whitman students and alumni, as well as student news programs and more. An Environment for Learning To support all this teamwork- and technology-enhanced learning-by-doing, the Whitman School’s new 160,000-square-foot building, completed in 2005, is student-focused by design. It features 20 team meeting-rooms each for undergraduate and graduate students, all outfitted with the latest technology, and wireless Internet access throughout. Numerous conversation areas encourage casual interaction among students, faculty, staff, alumni, and visitors. There are 22 state-of-the-art classrooms, 74 faculty offices, a 100-seat café and 200-seat auditorium, an awesome three-story, 4,000 square foot Grand Hall, and a special events room with an outdoor terrace and a view of the campus and nearby...

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Smart Learning at Alma College

Where Spring Term Knows No Boundaries Do you like to think outside the box? At Alma College, in Michigan, during the four-week Spring Term, students and professors together step outside the proverbial box—and across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries. For example, they: Explore the rain forest and the indigenous communities along the Amazon River. Conduct archival research at the John F. Kennedy presidential library in Boston. Study Virginia Woolf's novels and essays in both London and Cornwall, England.  These represent a few of the nearly 50 courses available in Spring Term—40 percent of which are travel courses, including 10 international options.  Whatever the course, focusing intently on a single topic results in a greater depth of understanding about the subject and awakens new areas of interest. Says Marc Setterlund, Associate Provost and Professor of Psychology, “For me, the greatest educational benefit of Spring Term is the amount of time professors and students have to devote to an academic topic.”  Unfortunately, heavy course loads and other obligations during regular semesters can render such opportunities impractical or impossible for most college students. But Alma’s  “4-4-1” academic calendar–with 14-week terms in fall and winter and the 4-week spring term in May—makes it work. Spring Term courses are offered both on campus and off. On-campus courses may feature an abundance of field trips or other unique experiences. Off-campus locales range from nearby southwest Michigan and the Great Lakes region to San Francisco, Boston, Washington, D.C., Great Britain, Ecuador, China, and more.  During their four years, students are required to successfully complete two Spring Term courses, and one must cross geographical, cultural or disciplinary boundaries. Many find the experience so rewarding that they choose to attend every year. Those enrolled full time in the preceding Fall and Winter terms pay tuition and board but no room charge to live on campus in Spring Term. Equipment, laboratory, travel, and off-campus room and board fees vary, and are outlined in the course list.  Spring Term travel courses change every year, but a list of past domestic and international travel courses shows just how exciting it can be to think outside the box at Alma. What might be a good question to ask during a college tour of Alma College? How about this:  How can I immerse myself in unique learning experiences and still graduate on time? The answer is likely to involve one or more Spring Term courses that cross the usual boundaries. *** A researcher, writer, and editor with a special interest in education, Lisa Warren is a featured contributor to SmartCollegeVisit.  *** For more videos related  to our on-going series: Smart Learning™, Smart See, Smart Do™, and...

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Lisa Warren

Lisa Warren worked in undergraduate admissions for eight years.  A graduate of the University of Richmond (Virginia) in English and journalism, she also studied at George Mason University (Fairfax, Virginia) in the English Department for two years, once as an undergraduate and once as a graduate student.  Lisa lives in central Virginia with her teen-aged son, who hopes to play football for Virginia Tech someday, and her school-age daughter, who wants to be a teacher.  You’re invited to connect with Lisa in LinkedIn by visiting her at: Lisa Campbell...

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