I Have To Take WHAT? Theory and Process of Communication?
Nov19

I Have To Take WHAT? Theory and Process of Communication?

We asked our interns to write about a class they had to take but really hated having to do so. Chelsea Merget, a senior at Boston University, is pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in Psychology. Here's what Chelsea has to say about having to take Theory and Process of Communication. There's Always Room For More Knowledge By Chelsea Merget As a student exploring potential college classes, you’ll discover that every degree has a few dreaded core curriculum requirements that no student actually wants to take–even though these classes provide a foundation for the rest of your academic and working career. I am a senior at Boston University and with graduation rapidly approaching, my case of senioritis is getting more and more severe. Final degree requirements are definitely not on my fun list of things to do.  Alas, this semester I ended up taking: “Theory and Process of Communication.” Sounds riveting, right? It is one of the core classes standing between me and my Bachelor's of Science in Communication. The first day of class I showed up with an extremely negative attitude. What could this class possibly teach me that I haven’t already learned? A lot, it turns out. Professor Shanahan has a witty and dry sense of humor that engages and acknowledges the intelligence of his audience. The concepts he teaches are applicable and relatable to students. This class has truly transformed my communication style–something I thought was set in stone long ago. This class has challenged me and pressed me to examine all of the minute details of everyday interaction that are too often overlooked. It has given me an entirely new perspective and awareness about how I communicate with people and how they choose to interact with me. I grossly underestimated the value of this class and how its concepts will be applied to my future career. I’m glad I learned that there’s always room for more knowledge. ~~~ Chelsea Merget is a public relations intern with Smart College Visit representing Boston University. The views and opinions of college likes and dislikes are the personal opinion of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors and staff at Smart College Visit, Inc. Click here to read more of Chelsea's great work!  ~~~ Learn more about our Campus Rep Internship Program! You can read more from our interns in the Campus Rep Blog Series.  Campus Visit Tip:  Make an appointment to meet with a professor or advisor for the major that interests you. Ask to see the degree requirements so you can get a good idea of what the curriculum will be should you...

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Have Questions on Your College Tour ? Ask the Natives
Sep09

Have Questions on Your College Tour ? Ask the Natives

We asked Chelsea Merget, our public relations intern from Boston University, if students or parents touring campus ever stop and ask her questions. They do and below is Chelsea's take on her role as a BU native.  I have been approached by several students visiting the campus. I also work in an area on campus that handles a lot of visiting traffic so I have had rather lengthy conversations with parents and students about BU.   One of my favorite questions a student asked was, "What did I like least about BU?" Even though it was kind of difficult for me to answer, I really appreciated her train of thought–what complaints do these students really have about their school? Instead of answering where the best place to live is or my favorite place to hang out like I have a hundred times, I actually had to think about a negative knowing it could make or break a college decision. I was honest about the cost of tuition being a challenge and that sometimes we wonder where our undergrad fee goes. There was no positive way to answer this question except to be completely honest.  Another factor that really makes a difference when answering questions is having the student, not the parent, do the asking. It is the student, after all, who will be attending the college, so they should ask questions that they want answered.   Even with the parent present, there is a difference in how I answer questions compared to when I am directly addressing a student.  My answers are more informal, more approachable, and possibly more honest and frank with a student.  When parents ask questions, a lot of times students feel the need to impress them with statistics, facts, and the typical answers. I always feel more comfortable giving my honest opinion to a student directly, especially if the student is alone. In addition, I think the student feels a more personal connection with the school if they have a real, human interaction with another student.   *** Asking a student on campus what they like least is a great question! Here are 15 other questions to consider asking when on your college tour: Student-to-Student: Questions to ask on a College...

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What NOT to Bring to College
Jun04

What NOT to Bring to College

Already thinking about what to bring to college? How about what NOT to bring?

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