Smart Q & A: How can a teen succeed in college with AD/HD?
Aug18

Smart Q & A: How can a teen succeed in college with AD/HD?

QUESTION: What does a teen with AD/HD need to do to make a successful transition to college? ANSWER: From: Robin Roman Wright, founder, Robin Roman Wright Consulting Rising college freshmen with AD/HD can have an exciting, fruitful and successful first year in school. However, there are some helpful steps that students with AD/HD can take before going to school, during their first few days at school, and throughout the first semester that will help them to make a successful transition. The following list is not exhaustive but is what I recommend to my bright, creative AD/HD clients who are starting college. Before You Go: Think about your learning style. Identify your preferred learning style so that you can either choose courses based on Professor’s teaching styles or adapt your study approach when taking a course where the Professor teaches in a way that doesn’t match your preferred style. Some students do better listening to lectures. Some students need written notes in order to listen most productively. Some students thrive in classes where the Professor encourages discussion. Some students like to refer back to a text book in order to truly learn the subject at hand. Find out if the school has a Disability Office or an Academic Support Office: Many schools have a Disability Office that will help students who have AD/HD or other learning disabilities navigate the transition to college and support a student by providing tutoring, a quiet space to take tests, extended time on tests, help with setting up and managing your study schedule, etc. Usually, you can check out the intake process and forms needed online prior to talking to someone. If you want to make use of any of these services, contact the office early, before the semester begins. There is usually a process to getting approved and this can take time. Find out if the school has academic support services for the student body as a whole. Colleges usually have academic support resources for college freshman that are open to all students.  I encourage students to make use of these resources early and often.  This often includes a Writing Center for help with writing assignments, Peer Tutors and sometimes Time Management Mentors. SURVIVING THE FIRST SEMESTER Print out the Academic Calendar for the First Semester. Particularly make note of Add/Drop Dates. Check out when holidays are scheduled. Note mid-term and final exam schedules. Set 1st Semester Goals: What will my GPA goal be? What do I want to learn or explore as a college student — what subjects really interest me? Should I become involved in extracurricular activities? How many? Which ones? During Your First...

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