Tweets to Virginia Tech from New Hokies!
Mar22

Tweets to Virginia Tech from New Hokies!

— Admission offers are out! Congrats to the Virginia Tech class of 2018!

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Smart College Visit: 1-Stop Shop
Feb02

Smart College Visit: 1-Stop Shop

When it comes to how we serve college-bound teens and their parents, this video pretty much says it all. We’re a 1-stop shop.       Credits: Created by Nick Gagianas, Virginia Tech, 2011 Recorded at Pictograph Records Studio August, 2011 Engineer/Programming Kenneth Francis Musician: Mark M. Horwtiz Recorded using Apple Logic Software Post Production Rick King Owner/Engineer KING SOUND STUDIO http://www.kingsoundstudio.com/ Copyright Smart College Visit,...

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Choosing which Colleges to Visit: The 5-Hour Drive Limit
Nov28

Choosing which Colleges to Visit: The 5-Hour Drive Limit

Academics. Extracurriculars. Costs. Any of these are important factors to consider when deciding which college makes the list of schools to visit, but often even that is not enough –  a 5-hour drive limit can save time and money. We talked with Celeste, mom of a high school junior, about the other factors that influenced the college selection process for her son. Check out what made this family’s list, then tell us, what’s on your list of criteria? SCV: You mentioned visiting three schools with two more on the list for fall. How did you/your son decide which schools to visit? Celeste: My son is VERY interested in doing Air Force ROTC in college. (In fact, his first choice is actually the Air Force Academy.) He wants to go to a college where the ROTC program is actually on campus, which severely limits his options. My husband and I created a list for him of those schools that were within about a five-hour drive of family members on the East Coast–we can’t afford to fly him back and forth across the country and we want family members to be able to reach him if there is an emergency. SCV: Aside from ROTC and location, what were the other factors related to deciding where to visit? Celeste: My son looked at the web sites and found that most of them had programs for what he most wants to participate in for extracurriculars–cross-country and band–so that was not a deciding factor. He then looked at the acceptance rates, GPAs, SATs. The ones that were more demanding were more interesting to him because he likes a challenge. The schools that made his list were: University of Virginia (UVA), Virginia Tech, Duke, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) and the United States Air Force Academy (the only exception to our 5-hour drive rule). SCV: What were the visit experiences like for you/your son? Celeste: The first one was amazing, possibly because everything was new and a bit overwhelming. By the fourth one, we were tired of information sessions. Some schools, like UVA and UNC-Chapel Hill, did a great job of making it interesting and engaging. We walked away with a good sense of the school’s culture and what they stood for. Duke’s was average–it provided a good overview, but it was too long. Virginia Tech’s seemed boring–although it might have more to do with our early-morning drive there than the speaker herself, I didn’t feel I had a sense of what Tech was all about. My son felt that way about the information session as well, but he really enjoyed the tour there. The...

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Will You Pick Which Colleges to Visit Based on Cost?
Nov06

Will You Pick Which Colleges to Visit Based on Cost?

By Abigail Seldin, co-founder of CollegeAbacus.com A junior in high school, Sarah* has always been good at math and science. Her mom has offered to take her on a college visit trip to see engineering schools, but doesn’t want Sarah to get her heart set on a school that they can’t afford. Sarah’s top choices are Carnegie Mellon, Virginia Tech and Georgia Tech. Sarah’s mom thinks that visiting Carnegie Mellon is a waste of time, as the sticker price for Carnegie Mellon exceeds their post-tax income of $50,000. Instead, she’s encouraging Sarah to visit Virginia Tech (where she will get in-state tuition) and Georgia Tech. To help convince her mom to drive her to Carnegie Mellon for a visit, Sarah used College Abacus to generate a free estimate of how much financial aid she could expect from her dream school. Sarah’s guidance counselor told her that College Abacus is like a Kayak.com for financial aid, and uses calculators built by the colleges to create its estimates. Sarah and her counselor thought that the free online tool might help her decide which schools to visit during her junior year. To her surprise, Sarah learned that Carnegie Mellon would cost only $4000 more per year than in-state tuition at Virginia Tech. After Sarah’s mom saw the College Abacus results, she and Sarah agreed to add Carnegie Mellon to their itinerary, and to leave Georgia Tech off their list. You can scroll down to see Sarah’s detailed results, or visit CollegeAbacus.com to find out which schools will offer you financial aid before you...

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Visit Virginia Tech Mobile App Available for Android & iPhone
Jul12

Visit Virginia Tech Mobile App Available for Android & iPhone

Smart College Visit releases:  Visit VT The Visit Virginia Tech Guide to Campus is designed for prospective students, their families, friends, and anyone planning a visit to Virginia Tech’s beautiful campus nestled in the New River Valley in Blacksburg, Virginia. The goal: to create a positive visitor experience making it easy for visitors to plan, book travel, and navigate the Virginia Tech Campus. Visit Virginia Tech is available free on Google Play and iTunes. Virginia Tech is a client of Smart College Visit, Inc. Colleges considering a mobile app project are invited to contact us at 540.200.8780...

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College Visits and the Decision Making Process of Teens
Mar18

College Visits and the Decision Making Process of Teens

College Visit – College Smidget! You may be shocked to learn that for some students visiting a lot of colleges is not a top priority during the college selection process. In fact, going on a traditional campus tour and sitting in an hour-long information session is just not that important–at least, that’s what three University Honor Students at Virginia Tech conveyed to me at recent dinner event. There I was, sitting with a small group of really bright, ambitious, college students excited to learn about what led them to choose to study at Virginia Tech. Their stories were all different and each one surprised me: Student #1 attended the graduation ceremony for one of his friends and decided Tech was where he wanted to go to school. Done deal. He applied, was offered admission and he accepted. No reason to come back until freshman orientation. Student #2 came to visit a friend already enrolled at the university. They two of them spent the weekend hiking in the gorgeous New River Valley, known for its natural beauty. He never set foot on campus but left Blacksburg knowing this was where he wanted to enroll. Student #3 applied to Tech at 10 PM, just 2 hours before the midnight application deadline, was later accepted, and came up for Hokie Focus in April (to his credit, thinking that perhaps he should at least see campus before accepting the offer of admission). However, it was not the beautiful campus that inspired him to accept the offer right then and there, it was meeting the head of the University Honors program. The student left a deposit and accepted the offer of admission before leaving campus. So, what does all this mean?   That what “everyone” tells you to do–begin college visits in your junior year…visit before you apply…that the visit is the  most important part of college selection process–is wrong? No, of course not.  It simply means that each student has to find his or her fit his or her way. Each of these three students enjoyed a visit experience that gave them comfort and insight about the future they considered. Alternatives are nice. From attending an event, such as graduation, to visiting the region as a tourist, to participating in a program on campus, there are many ways to discover which school is the right one.  What’s right for you? Virginia Tech will offer an expanded information and campus tour schedule to accommodate the increase in campus visitors during the peak visit periods when high school students are typically on spring break, March 31 – April 13, 2012. Registration is required. Hokie Focus,...

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