Next on CampusChat: Christmas Break and College Kids
Dec18

Next on CampusChat: Christmas Break and College Kids

How do you cope when the kids come home from college? 'Tis the season for college kids to vacate campus and re-enter life at home. They've been gone for 3-4 months, living independently, taking responsibility for themselves (and their laundry), and now they're back.  For parents of freshmen, it's a season of firsts–first time back home for an extended stay (most semester breaks are 3-4 weeks long), first college grade report, and the first time your child returns to the fold (just long enough to get back into the family routine before returning to school). Parents, what are your expectations? And, for those who have already gone through this, what advice do you have to share? Bring your questions and expectations to the next CampusChat, this Wednesday, December 22, 2010 at 9PM, Eastern, and we'll chat via Twitter about college kids' homecoming.  Remember to tag your tweets with "#campuschat" to participate in the conversation. For more information about CampusChat: What is CampusChat Twitter Tools & Resources Takeaway Tweets & Transcript from #CampusChat & #PTChat  ...

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Top Five FAFSA Mistakes: How to avoid them
Jun22

Top Five FAFSA Mistakes: How to avoid them

What are the top 5 FAFSA mistakes made by families? Russell Golowin, founder of College Relief Funding, LLC, shares his insight on the pitfalls and common mistakes by families regarding the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) application process.   Not filing the FAFSA at all. Many families assume that they are not eligible for the benefits of the FAFSA. The only way to be positive that you will not receive any federal aid is to not file the FAFSA. Applying to schools based on “Sticker Price”. The point of the FAFSA is to give aid where it is due. Sometimes by choosing to attend a reach school that seems expensive at face value, you are more likely to receive more aid when all the steps are taken properly. Students could possibly have greater difficulty affording a moderately priced school with minimal aid as opposed to a higher-priced school with maximal aid. Filing the FAFSA Late. Financial aid is first come, first serve! Don’t minimize your aid by making this silly mistake! Applying to a minimum number of schools. By applying to several schools, you give yourself options. If you only apply to one safety and one reach school, neither school is likely to give you very much aid at all. The reach school knows that if you get accepted there, you will probably want to go there. The safety school knows that if you don’t get into the reach school, you will have to go there. Golowin suggests that students apply to at least six schools. Becoming informed too late in the process. Many families don’t start actually learning about the process until pressure is overwhelming—deadlines need to be met, papers need to be filled out and filed, and final decisions need to be made. Golowin suggests that families start planning no later than a student’s junior year in high school and encourages beginning as early as middle school. By beginning early, the student has a lot of time to learn about deadlines and college options. To learn more about the financial aid planning process, join us Wednesday, June 23, 2010 at 9 p.m., Eastern, for #CampusChat on Twitter. Russell Golowin, founder of College Relief Funding (on the web at http://graduate4less.com) will be our expert guest. ### Chelsea Merget, a junior at Boston University is pursuing a degree in Communications with a minor in Psychology. She is spending the summer as a public relations intern with Smart College Visit,...

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